pretty-noot

takozu:

break-the-frozenheart:

tan-the-man:

camiekahle:

ageotropic:

youjustwaitandsee:

image

Okay… That’s it… I think I’m going to set this as my alarm on my phone so I can feel like I’m waking up in heaven on a daily basis.

There’s just something about children’s choirs.

There’s just something about this song

Okay, let me tell you a thing about this song. My mother is a nurse in the NICU with small premature babies. and she had one baby that was born addicted to 5 different drugs. Needless to say, the poor baby had to suffer through intense withdrawals, and my mom discovered that this song was incredibly soothing for the baby while he went through all of his pain. She would play this during his rougher patches, and it would calm him down. So yes, there is something about this song. 

Fun facts!

This song is a mele (soft, metered song with music) in contrast to an oli (a chant), and translated, it’s a song actually for Chief Kalakaua and Cheifess Lili’ulani. It tells of the beautiful scenery of all the islands, and specifically, a beautiful blooming flower that withstands the summits of each significant peak of Hawaii (including Mauna Kea!). 
If you contrast the words mele and oli, you will hear them (say them outloud!) how soft, and harsh they are respectively. This mele is comprised of mostly soft, flowing words (save for the name of the mountains!) and the combination of those beautiful words used to name beautiful things and the Children’s Chorus is probably what it is.

Peace(fulness) transcends language.

pretty-noot
areyoufrckingkiddingme:

hate:

typical:

parliamentarians:

Racism and ignorance clearly evident in our society, as experienced by my friend’s sister. This is what her potential dorm roommate, whom she had never met or talked to before, tweeted about her.
"Today I googled my last name and found this as one of the search results. Apparently, just by looking at my profile picture, I am Indian and I can barely speak english. This, my friends, is a prime example of racial profiling. I am an American citizen. I was born in Houston, Texas. My roots are not from India but from Africa. My parents are Algerian. I am Algerian American. English is my primary language and it is a struggle for me to speak my parent’s native tongue. My name is pronounced exactly as it is spelled. I wear a hijab (a head covering), and not a niqab ( a facial covering that excludes the eyes) though I do admire, respect, and find the beauty in all those who do choose to wear the niqab. But this girl is right, I probably would have had a heart attack living with a person who could not, and refused to, respect me and my beliefs. I can only thank God for an opening of a single room shortly after they assigned this roommate, way before I knew she had posted any of this. Alhamdullilah. I also thank God for being born in Houston, one of the most multicultural cities in the United States, and not experiencing racism like this everyday of my life. Sunday is my move in day and the start of my college career. This can be nothing but a good sign for the years to come, inshaAllah.  In conclusion, I urge everyone, please, don’t judge a person by their appearances. Racism exists in this nation because we continue to do so. We have to look beyond the covers of appearances and read the texts of their characters. Stand with me and ‪#‎stopracism‬.” -Roukaya Mabizari

She should be banned from life

this is so fucked up

this makes my fucking stomach hurt.

areyoufrckingkiddingme:

hate:

typical:

parliamentarians:

Racism and ignorance clearly evident in our society, as experienced by my friend’s sister. This is what her potential dorm roommate, whom she had never met or talked to before, tweeted about her.

"Today I googled my last name and found this as one of the search results. Apparently, just by looking at my profile picture, I am Indian and I can barely speak english. This, my friends, is a prime example of racial profiling. I am an American citizen. I was born in Houston, Texas. My roots are not from India but from Africa. My parents are Algerian. I am Algerian American. English is my primary language and it is a struggle for me to speak my parent’s native tongue. My name is pronounced exactly as it is spelled. I wear a hijab (a head covering), and not a niqab ( a facial covering that excludes the eyes) though I do admire, respect, and find the beauty in all those who do choose to wear the niqab. But this girl is right, I probably would have had a heart attack living with a person who could not, and refused to, respect me and my beliefs. I can only thank God for an opening of a single room shortly after they assigned this roommate, way before I knew she had posted any of this. Alhamdullilah. I also thank God for being born in Houston, one of the most multicultural cities in the United States, and not experiencing racism like this everyday of my life.
Sunday is my move in day and the start of my college career. This can be nothing but a good sign for the years to come, inshaAllah.
In conclusion, I urge everyone, please, don’t judge a person by their appearances. Racism exists in this nation because we continue to do so. We have to look beyond the covers of appearances and read the texts of their characters. Stand with me and ‪#‎stopracism‬.”
-Roukaya Mabizari

She should be banned from life

this is so fucked up

this makes my fucking stomach hurt.